Offering a new look at the iconic American artist Georgia O’Keeffe, the Brooklyn Museum is proud to present the major exhibition Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern. Alongside some of the Georgia O’Keefe art pieces, the show will mark the first time the artist’ understated, yet remarkable wardrobe will be presented in dialogue with key paintings, photographs, jewelry, accessories, and ephemera. Part of A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, a yearlong project celebrating a decade of feminist thinking at the museum, the exhibition looks at the iconic artist’s powerful ownership of her identity as an author and a woman.

 

O’Keeffe

Left: Georgia O’Keeffe – Georgia O’Keeffe (American, 1887–1986). Blue #2, 1916. Watercolor on paper, 15⅞ x 11 in. (40.3 x 27.8 cm). Brooklyn Museum; Bequest of Mary T. Cockcroft, by exchange, 58.74. (Photo: Sarah DeSantis, Brooklyn Museum / Right: Georgia O’Keeffe – Georgia O’Keeffe (American, 1887‒1986). Black Pansy & Forget-Me-Nots (Pansy), 1926. Oil on canvas, 27⅛ x 12¼ in. (68.9 x 31.1 cm). Brooklyn Museum; Gift of Mrs. Alfred S. Rossin, 28.521. (Photo: Christine Gant, Brooklyn Museum)

 

The Exhibition Theme

“This exhibition reveals O’Keeffe’s commitment to core principles associated with modernism—minimalism, seriality, simplification—not only in her art but also in her distinctive style of dress,” says Lisa Small, Curator of European Painting and Sculpture, Brooklyn Museum, who serves as the exhibition’s in-house coordinator. Organized by guest curator Wanda M. Corn, Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor Emerita in Art History, Stanford University, and coordinated by Lisa Small, Curator of European Painting and Sculpture, Brooklyn Museum, the show exposes how O’Keeffe was an artist not only in her studio, but also in her homemaking and self-fashioning.

 

O’Keeffe

Georgia O’Keeffe (American, 1887–1986). Pool in the Woods, Lake George, 1922. Pastel on paper, 17 x 27½ in. (43.3 x 69.9 cm). Reynolda House Museum of American Art, Winston-Salem, N.C.; Gift of Barbara B. Millhouse in memory of E. Carter, Nancy Susan Reynolds, and Winifred Babcock, 1984.2.9. Courtesy of Reynolda House Museum of American Art, affiliated with Wake Forest University. © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

 

Various Parts of the Show

The exhibition opens with an introduction that demonstrates the beginning of the artist’s signature clothing style as a high school student, and continues in four parts, covering the years spent in New York, between 1920s and 1930, her life with Alfred Stieglitz whose multiyear, serial project which lifted the artist to become one of the most photographed American artist in history is also featured. The second section focuses on the years spent in New Mexico and the exposure to the desert landscape, whose colors influenced and inspired both her paintings and palette. A small third section explores the influence and importance of Asian aesthetics in her personal style. The final section displays images made after Stieglitz’s era by photographers who came to visit her in the Southwest. This section features some of the luminary photographers as Alfred Stieglitz, Ansel Adams, Philippe Halsman, Yousuf Karsh, Todd Webb, Cecil Beaton, Bruce Weber, Annie Leibovitz, and others. These images, alongside with the garments and artworks on view, testify to the way that O’Keeffe learned to use the photographic settings as a way to construct her persona, seen as a pioneer of modernism.

 

Georgia O’Keeffe

Left: Georgia O’Keeffe – Georgia O’Keeffe (American, 1887–1986). Patio with Cloud, 1956. Oil on canvas, 36 x 30 in. (91.4 x 76.2 cm). Milwaukee Art Museum; Gift of Mrs. Edward R. Wehr, M1957.10. © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. (Photo: P. Richard Eells) / Right: Georgia O’Keeffe – Georgia O’Keeffe (American, 1887–1986). Brooklyn Bridge, 1949. Oil on Masonite, 48 x 35⅞ in. (121.8 x 91.1 cm). Brooklyn Museum; Bequest of Mary Childs Draper, 77.11. (Photo: Brooklyn Museum)

 

Georgia O’Keeffe Art and Fashion at Brooklyn Museum

The exhibition Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Memory at Brooklyn Museum is the first show which examines the renowned artist’s self-created persona. Being part of a yearlong project celebrating a decade of feminist thinking at the Brooklyn Museum, the exhibition also represents a homecoming of sorts, as the artist had her first solo museum exhibition at the museum in 1927. Examining the construction of the persona recognized as both an icon of style and modernism, the exhibition presents, for the first time, a dialogue between O’Keeffe’s wardrobe and her art. Opening on March 3rd, 2017 the show will be on view through July 23rd, 2017. For more information about the show, its organizers, sponsors, and ticket prices please visit the official web page of the Brooklyn Museum.

 

All images courtesy of Brooklyn Museum. Featured image in slider: Georgia O’Keeffe (American, 1887–1986). Ram’s Head, White Hollyhock—Hills (Ram’s Head and White Hollyhock, New Mexico), 1935. Oil on canvas, 30 x 36 in. (76.2 x 91.4 cm). Brooklyn Museum; Bequest of Edith and Milton Lowenthal, 1992.11.28. (Photo: Brooklyn Museum); Ansel Adams (American, 1902–1984). Georgia O’Keeffe and Orville Cox, 1937. Gelatin silver print, 7¾ x 11 in. (19.7 x 27.9 cm). Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, N.M.; Gift of The Georgia O’Keeffe Foundation, 2006.06.1480. © 2016 The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust; Left: Attributed to Georgia O’Keeffe. Dress (Tunic and Underdress), circa 1926. Ivory silk crepe. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, N.M.; Gift of Juan and Anna Marie Hamilton, 2000.03.0235 and 2000.03.0236. (Photo: © Gavin Ashworth / Center: Wrap Dress, circa 1960s–70s. Black cotton. Inner garment: Carol Sarkisian (American, 1936–2013). Wrap dress, circa 1970s. White cotton. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, N.M., 2000.03.0601 and 2000.03.0410. (Photo: © Gavin Ashworth) / Right: Attributed to Georgia O’Keeffe. Dress with Matching Belt, circa 1930s. Black wool, crepe and white silk. Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe, N.M.; Gift of Juan and Anna Marie Hamilton, 2000.3.355a-b. (Photo: © Gavin Ashworth)

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